Things You Should Know About Your House Down Payment

April 7, 2021
Things You Should Know About Your House Down Payment

When someone says they’re saving for a house, what they actually mean is that they’re saving for a mortgage down payment. It’s unusual for anyone to show up with the full value of a property in cash, though it may be more common in today’s frantic real-estate market.

A down payment is a significant sum of money that you will put into the purchase of your new home, in which you will make monthly payments on a mortgage loan to pay off the remainder. Before you buy the property outright, it may take twenty or thirty years, or even longer.

For many people, the down payment is the most significant impediment to homeownership. Monthly mortgage payments may be the same as — or even less than — what someone would pay in house rent in the same neighborhood. However, in order to get to that point, a potential homebuyer must first have the required down payment, which may be as much as $30,000 or more in the bank.

Don’t give up! Here’s what you need to hear before making a down payment.

A lower down payment means paying private mortgage insurance

If you can’t afford a 20% down payment, your lender would almost certainly require you to pay Private Mortgage Insurance (PMI). This is because your bank or lender views a loan with less than a 20% down payment as a riskier loan that requires protection in the event you default on your payments.

Things You Should Know About Your House Down Payment - mortgage

PMIs range between 0.5 percent and 1% of the mortgage amount (annually) and these fees are included in the monthly mortgage payments. When you have 80 percent equity in your house, you can stop paying PMI.

A down payment of less than 20% is possible when purchasing a house

There are definite benefits to putting down a 20% down payment, but it is by no means needed. The average down payment on a home has been between 5% and 7% in the last five years.

Keep in mind, though, that the type of loan you choose will affect how much you put down (and the length of the loan). A traditional loan, for example, requires a minimum of 3% down payment and is either 15 or 30 years long. A 3.5 percent down payment is needed for an FHA (Federal Housing Administration) loan.

A lower down payment allows you to purchase a house faster and save money for other expenses such as renovations and home improvements.

However, a lower down payment increases the monthly mortgage payments, and you’ll almost certainly need to include private mortgage insurance.

The more money you put down on a house, the lower your interest rate will be

It’s simple: if you borrow less, you’ll have less debt to repay and can pay less in net interest. When the loan-to-value (LTV) ratio is lower, mortgage lenders and banks normally give better interest rates. Before approving you for a home loan, banks use your loan-to-value ratio (expressed as a percentage) to determine how risky you are.

A higher down payment also raises your home equity, which is the value of your home that you haven’t lent against and will use to refinance at a lower interest rate.

Also Read: What Is the Legal Description of Property?

Don’t use up any of your money to pay for your down payment

Sure, you’ve been diligently saving for your down payment, but keep in mind that a bank will not grant you a mortgage until you have a certain amount of money in your bank account.

Banks and lenders would want you to be able to make your monthly payments for at least the first two to three months, often known as a cash reserve requirement. You’ll need to show that you have liquid assets in your checking or savings accounts, your bank can also accept money kept in the form of stocks, shares, 401(k)s, and other financial instruments. If your monthly mortgage payment is $2000, your lender would expect you to have at least $4000 on hand.

Bear in mind that you’ll have to make more than just your monthly mortgage payments. There are also closing expenses, such as title insurance, renters insurance, and a home inspection. Your closing costs will vary between 2% and 5% of your purchase price. So, if you purchase a house for $500,000, the closing costs could be between $10,000 and $20,000.

FYI: If you’ve been saving for a down payment but are having trouble making it happen, a down payment assistance program such as an FHA or VA loan might be able to help. These services provide support from government agencies, nonprofits, and labor unions that can be used as loans before you move in, or even as grants that you don’t have to pay back. Homeownership may seem to be out of reach financially, but it may be closer than you think.

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Things You Need To Know Before You Start House Hunting

March 8, 2021
Things You Need To Know Before You Start House Hunting

There’s More to It Than the Price

Before You start house hunting. This is the part where you’ll need some cash upfront, so be sure to budget for it. Purchasing a home is never just about the price tag!

Your current budget will change

Consider your current monthly spending. Food, insurance, gas, rent, utilities, and caring for any dependents or pets account for a significant portion of most people’s income. Budgeting will become your best friend until you have a monthly mortgage payment to make.

Your weekly movie outings, occasional Starbucks, and weekend shopping sprees can become less important to you than paying your mortgage bill on time, so make sure you outline and discuss all of your current expenses appropriately.

You may wonder how you’ll deal with and adapt to these changes. Decide what are the most critical aspects of your lifestyle and what can be sacrificed. There are a few options available to assist you in keeping track of your finances.

To ensure that you can afford your mortgage payments, you must decide on a price range for your new home that makes sense for you based on your monthly spending.

Does it prevent you from saving for other things or achieving your life goals?

Isn’t it true that your key life goal is to become a homeowner? Why are you here in the first place? Other goals, on the other hand, should be kept in mind if they are important to your future.

These are just things to keep in mind so you don’t spend too much money on your home and neglect to save for other important goals. Fortunately, the internet’s vastness offers a plethora of websites to choose from if you’re looking for a way to keep track of your objectives.

Your Credit Score: Something You Should Know But Probably Don’t

Before you start fantasizing about your wrap-around porch, and stainless steel appliances, make sure you have a credit score that banks will be proud of.

In general, a higher credit score means a lower interest rate, which means more money in your wallet.

Things You Need To Know Before You Start House Hunting

Before you start looking for a home, talk to a few banks to get pre-qualified for a mortgage based on your credit score. You’ll be able to get an idea of how much you can easily afford this way before jumping in.

Related : How Your Credit Score Impact Mortgage Rates

Fortunately, there are many online tools for determining your credit score. For a free credit report and a $1 credit score, go to freecreditreport.com.

Evaluate various mortgage options based on the requirements

Before you start falling in love with that ranch on in your dream neighborhood, you should really look into what types of mortgages are available to you depending on your financial situation.

The bank will assist you in determining what types of mortgages and interest rates you can handle, allowing your agent to quickly narrow down homes in your price range.

You should look into a Federal Housing Administration (FHA) loan if you don’t have enough money to put down 20%.

If you don’t pay your mortgage, the FHA guarantees to reimburse the lender. Lenders would encourage you to take out a big loan with an FHA loan because they know the government will pay it back.

If you have enough funds for a 20% down payment but don’t want to deal with the budget constraints or mortgage insurance premiums associated with an FHA loan… You’re better off getting a traditional loan.

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How to Get Your Home Ready for Renters?

November 18, 2020
How to Get Your Home Ready for Renters?

It can be a great investment to own a rental home, but do you know how to plan a place for tenants properly? To get your home ready for tenants, check out these tips.

Carrying out inspections

This is another job that you can perform or leave to a specialist as long as it is professionally and thoroughly completed. To make sure it works properly and is ready to move in, check your home and everything in it. Check all the ceilings, windows, roofing, floors, doors, walls, systems (plumbing, HVAC, electrical, etc, and other structural components to make sure the construction of your home is in good condition. For mold, cracks, and water damage, keep an eye out. If the rental is furnished, make sure that in addition to ensuring that all the appliances are functioning properly, there are no furniture problems. Be sure to get them resolved as soon as possible if you find any issues.

Also Read: Things to Consider Before Moving into a Rental Property

Spruce Things Up

You can find that there are still changes to be made, even though everything works perfectly. On all your walls, lay a fresh coat of paint, do some outside landscaping, upgrade lighting fixtures, and make other improvements to refresh the space. You may also start updating countertops, appliances, and cabinetry. While upgrades and repairs can become costly, as a result, they can also boost the amount of renting you can charge.

How to Get Your Home Ready for Renters?

Give a thorough cleaning

Before renting, it’s important that you clean your home, preferably when searching for tenants, but definitely before anyone moves in. This should go beyond the normal cleaning routine to get to items like cleaning carpets, adjusting air filters, and scrubbing baseboards that are readily overlooked or put off. All that matters is that the work is done properly and from top to bottom. You can do it yourself or employ a cleaning company.

renting

For additional requirements check your mortgage

You may be needed to contact your mortgage company before renting out your house, depending on your lender and mortgage type. Your loan contract should list these requirements; if you have any concerns, contact a loan officer. If stated in your contract, you will need to follow up with details about the tenant or provide evidence of additional insurance. Contact your lender when in doubt.

Make it safe

A prospective renter needs to know that they live in a clean and safe house. Make sure that the locks are changed, make sure that all smoke alarms are in working order, and fit a full fire extinguisher in the kitchen. Try installing a home security device if you don’t already have one. A simple way to give your tenants more peace of mind as they step outside at night is to add motion sensor lights outside.

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