Storing Clothes in Storage Unit, The Proper Way!

April 28, 2021

Storing Clothes in Storage Unit, The Proper Way!

You want your clothes to come out in the same state they went in if you store them with the best storage unit business.  We spoke with a group of fashion and storage experts to find out what works and what doesn’t. We’ve compiled a list of ten pointers to help you store your clothes like a pro.

Wash your clothes

Before bringing your belongings to a storage facility, make sure they’re clean. It’s about more than just avoiding strange odors. When you take your clothes out of storage, you want to be able to wear them right away. Mold and mildew thrive in dirty laundry, which is a death sentence for your clothes.

Don’t vacuum pack

To save room, it might be tempting to vacuum pack your clothing, but this is not a good idea. When we asked Elisabeth Miller, a Move N’ Go storage specialist and consistency supervisor, what the fuss was about, she pointed out a few issues.

Don’t mix fabrics

Putting various types of clothes in the same box is one of the most popular clothing storage blunders. Throwing all into the same box might be fast and simple, but it also increases the risk of damaging your clothes.

“To keep looking new and fresh, natural fibers need to breathe,” Miller said. “Segment your clothes by color, and pay special attention to any fragile materials.”

There are also pragmatic explanations for this. Imagine how itchy your silk undies would be if you kept them in the same drawer as your wool sweaters. Oh, no.

Know when to hang and when to fold

Much like at home, you can hang or fold your clothes in your storage unit. You certainly don’t want to fold your pricey blouses or hang your exercise shirts on a hanger. The goal is for your clothing to look as good when it comes out of storage as it did when it went in.

Here are some items you most likely want to hang in a storage unit:

Blazers
Blouses
Button-ups
Dresses
Dress pants
Easily wrinkled clothing

Here are some items you most likely want to fold (or roll) in a storage unit:

Baby clothes
Leggings
Pants
Stretchy clothing
Sweaters
T-shirts
Underwear
Workout clothes

Roll your clothing

While it might be instinctive to fold your clothes, they will last longer in storage if you roll them. There are many advantages to rolling your clothes, according to Dave Bowden, a fashion writer at IrreverentGent.com.

“Folding is great at home when you’re going to wear something frequently,” Bowden said, “but after months of storage, those folds could turn into creases that are difficult to remove.” “Rolling clothes take up more room in storage, but it is a much safer choice for the clothes.”

Put heavier clothes on the bottom

By storing heavy objects at the bottom of your storage box, you can prolong the life of your clothes. Put the bulky winter clothes on the bottom of the box and the cute, thin ones on top, for example, if you have a sweater box. This not only keeps your clothes from creases, but it also helps them to breathe. This is a positive thing.

Use plastic bins

Plastic bins are usually the safest clothing storage containers. While cardboard boxes are less expensive, they do not protect your clothing from moisture or water damage. It’s even worse if you use secondhand cardboard boxes because bacteria—or pests—could be present.

A plastic container, on the other hand, has none of these issues—especially if you choose the right one. Laurice Baldwin, a co-founder of the fashion blog ClothedUp, suggests plastic bins with snap-close lids that keep dust, germs, and water out.

Buy wardrobe boxes

Wardrobe boxes are ideal for storing clothes that would usually be kept in your wardrobes, such as dresses and blazers, and the taller ones also have racks for hanging everything. Plastic containers without hanger racks are also available and are ideal for seasonal clothing such as winter coats and rain jackets. It all depends on which pieces of clothing are more essential than others.

Use cedar chips

To keep bugs at bay, place cedar chips (also known as cedar balls) in your clothing storage containers. The last thing you want is to take your clothes out of storage and discover that they’ve been eaten by creepy insects.

“There’s a good chance your clothes have been exposed to a moth infestation,” Move N’ Go’s Elisabeth Miller said. “Cedar chips will keep pests at bay while still protecting your clothes.”

Cedar chips also have a stronger odor than typical mothballs.

Get insurance

Buy clothing storage unit coverage in case anything goes wrong (like a break-in, fire, or flood). You should also get more protection if your clothes are expensive. Most storage companies have a variety of insurance policies from which to choose.

“It is usually really inexpensive. Miller said, “I paid about $10 a month to ensure a couple of thousand dollars worth of clothing.” “Purchasing insurance may provide peace of mind, particularly if you’re storing valuable items.”

FAQ

In three cases, a climate-controlled storage unit is worth considering:

Do I need climate-controlled storage for my clothes?

You’ll need to keep your clothes in storage for a long time.
The weather in your city is extremely hot.
Your clothing is either pricey or nostalgic.

Can I buy insurance from a self-storage unit?

When you lease a storage unit, most self-storage facilities offer insurance policies. You may choose the level of coverage that is most appropriate for your clothing storage.

How do I keep my clothes safe in a storage unit?

Choose a reputable storage facility, follow practical tips, and purchase storage unit insurance to keep your clothes dry in a storage unit. If you live in an area with high humidity or extreme temperatures, you might want to consider climate-controlled storage.