The Best Ways To Use Plastic Wrap For Moving

June 8, 2021

The Best Ways To Use Plastic Wrap For Moving

One of the simplest methods to save money is to perform the packing yourself, either by packing everything yourself or by leaving the antiques and fragile items for the movers to pack with care while you pack everything else. And if you’re packing by yourself, here’s a helpful tip using plastic wrap for moving.

When it comes time to move, you’ll need to stick to your budget. Moving isn’t cheap, and even doing it yourself comes with a price tag. Hiring full-service movers to handle everything is the most convenient option, but it is also the most expensive.

Shrinkwrap, stretch wrap, and saran wrap are all examples of plastic wrap. There are numerous ways to use plastic wrap for moving because it is versatile and waterproof. Here’s your guide to using plastic wrap for moving, covering everything from why it’s a good idea to how you can use it.

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Why Should You Use Plastic Wrap For Moving

To be honest, there isn’t a scarcity of packing supplies. Cardboard boxes have been around for a long time and have withstood the test of time, but they are now accompanied by so much more. However, when utilized appropriately during a relocation, plastic wrap has a number of advantages and should be on your list of packing materials.

Plastic wrap is one of the most versatile things on the market. It can keep jewelry from becoming tangled, keep dust and moisture out, bundle goods together, hold loose wires together, avoid spilling, carefully wrap goods like perfumes and nail paint, and much more.

One of the best qualities of plastic wrap is that it is non-adhesive. It sticks to itself, but it doesn’t have an adhesive surface like packing tape. It doesn’t leave any gummy stains that could damage your furniture, but it can stick to itself really well.

Plastic wrap is thin but strong, making it extremely easy to use. However, once wrapped, it may be very strong and tear-resistant, especially if wrapped several times.

Plastic wrap’s elastic structure allows it to resist tension from shifting objects. It’s sturdy enough to keep everything in place yet flexible enough to wrap around even the most unusually shaped objects.

Plastic wrap is rather affordable and readily accessible, so go ahead and stock up. You can use conventional wrapping paper, or you may use professional-grade wrapping paper that is suitable for transporting.

Plastic wrap’s elastic structure allows it to resist tension from shifting objects. It’s sturdy enough to keep everything in place yet flexible enough to wrap around even the most unusually shaped objects.

How To Use Plastic Wrap For Moving

Keeping Packing Material In Place

All of your products, big or small, will need to be wrapped in some sort of packing material. Bubble wrap or moving blankets will be used to wrap larger items of furniture while packing paper will be used to secure smaller pieces. However, no matter how much protective stuff you pile on, it won’t help you until you secure it. Strings, cord, tape or packing tape, and straps are among the items used to secure packing material. However, using plastic wrap is the safest option.

Wrap three to four rounds of wrap around the objects, pulling tight enough to stretch but not so tight that it rips. Make sure the ends are firmly pressed against the plastic wrap, and you’re ready to go. Smaller pieces of furniture and equipment can even be completely wrapped in plastic wrap. This not only protects the packing material from dust and moisture but also works as complete dust and moisture barrier.

Moving In Bad Weather

Working around the weather is one of the most inconvenient aspects of moving. If you’re moving during the off-season, keep in mind that it can rain or snow when you’re moving. And no matter how many times the weather prediction says ‘clear,’ there will always be a surprise shower or snowfall. In this case, waterproofing is necessary, which is where the plastic wrap comes in.

Plastic wrap is one of the greatest ways to protect your valuables from the weather because of its flexibility and waterproof nature. After all of the other packing materials have been secured, cover everything with a thick layer of plastic wrap. If you’re concerned, you can always wrap the products in plastic wrap first, then packing material, and last plastic wrap.

The main hazard is that if moisture does get through, it can lead to the growth of fungus or mold. Make sure the plastic wrap is securely fastened, and take extra care if the weather is bad. If you’re afraid of unloading in the rain or snow, choose climate-controlled storage and postpone it until the weather improves.

Valuable Items

It’s always difficult to pack valuables. You want to make sure they’re safe in transport, whether they’re fragile or not, but you can’t overpack them. Furthermore, avoid using tape and newspaper when packing valuable things to avoid ruining the surface with adhesive or ink stains. Simply wrap the item in enough packing paper and wrap it in plastic wrap several times in this circumstance.

Make sure it’s completely covered in plastic wrap, with no holes or openings. If you’re worried about the wrap coming undone, simply secure the ends with tape strips! There’s no reason why you can’t use packing tape on plastic wrap, and it just adds to its security. Simply be careful when unwrapping it, merely snipping off the pieces of tape and without damage the items by accident.

Fastening Loose Items Together

All the minute bits that break loose during shipment, hitting against everything and causing damage to surfaces, are an unforeseen enemy to your goods. Plastic wrap is a simple solution to avoid this and to keep similar-shaped things secured together in general. Here’s a quick rundown of how to accomplish it:

Hangers: Because of their unusual design, hangers can be difficult to pack. To keep the hangers tight, have someone hold roughly 5 similar-shaped hangers in place and wrap plastic wrap around them. You can either poke a hole in the plastic to allow the hooks to pass through or keep them wrapped in.

Parts: Whether it’s furniture or appliances, you want all of the pieces to stay together and in their proper placements during transportation. Cover the bubble wrap with a layer or two of plastic wrap before adding more.

Small oddly shaped items: Trust us, you’ll come across a lot of these during your move. Tools, doorknobs, curtain hooks, and bed rails can all be bundled together.

Hanging garments: Hanging garments require a distinct approach to packing, which is why we’ve included it in our blog. Instead of using tailored covers or waste bags, wrap the clothing in plastic wrap to protect them from dirt.

Wrap a few sheets of plastic wrap over the wires instead of tying them up with cord or thread. This shields the wires from dust and moisture, ensuring that they remain effective.

Packing Jewelry

When it comes to packing jewelry for a move, there are a lot of ways. A jewelry box is the most practical way to transport things, but you may do it yourself just as quickly. Necklaces and long, dangling earrings work best when wrapped in plastic wrap.

Place the necklaces lengthwise on a sheet of plastic wrap, arranging them so that they are stretched out. Make sure there’s at least an inch between them. Overlap the second sheet of plastic wrap of roughly the same size on top of the first. Press the sheets together around each necklace with your fingers, leaving an inch of space between them. This keeps your necklaces in one spot, preventing them from sliding about and becoming tangled.

Spill-Proof Bottles

Place the necklaces lengthwise on a sheet of plastic wrap, arranging them so that they are stretched out. Make sure there’s at least an inch between them. Overlap the second sheet of plastic wrap of roughly the same size on top of the first. Press the sheets together around each necklace with your fingers, leaving an inch of space between them. This keeps your necklaces in one spot, preventing them from sliding about and becoming tangled.

Keeping Doors and Drawers Closed

When your furniture is loaded and unloaded, it will most likely tilt and twist in every way, and trust us, you will see a lot of pivoting (without the havoc and devastation, of course!). Because the action causes the doors and drawers to swing and slide open, this can be an issue for furniture like drawers and closets. This can harm not just the furniture and its contents, but also the unfortunate mover who is hauling it up. Because the wrap is hard enough to not rip, a few rounds of plastic wrap can rapidly solve the problem.